Category Archives: Soviet fishing

FISH FLOUR and the Cobb Midwater Trawl

  Charles R. (Bob) Hitz    Bob’s Posting 29                   Mar. 9, 2015 Fish Flour brings back a lot of memories and the Ballad of the Hake enforces them. Reading them leaves one feeling that the hake project and fish flour were … Continue reading

Posted in Carmel Finley, Cold War, Dayton Lee Alverson, Environmental History, Exploratory Fishing Base, Fisheries policy, fisheries science, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Ocean fishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, R/V John N. Cobb, Rosefish, Sebastes rockfish, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

LBJ and FPC

One of the nice things about being a historian is that you get to gad around and go interesting places, like Austin, Texas, which happens to be the home of the Lyndon Baines Johnson presidential library. The library, you will … Continue reading

Posted in Cold War, Environmental History, Fisherie subsidies, Fisheries policy, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Marine Policy, Maritime History, Ocean fishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet fishing, Soviet history', World History | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ballad of the Hake, by Herb Shippen

We are close to finishing our book, which means we have been thinking a lot of about the 1960s and the foreign boats showing up off the coast of Oregon and Washington, as Bob Hitz has told us about. More … Continue reading

Posted in Carmel Finley, Cold War, Dayton Lee Alverson, Environmental History, Fisherie subsidies, Fisheries policy, fisheries science, George Moskovita, History of Science, History of Technology, Marine Policy, Maritime History, Ocean fishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, World History | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 7,800 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway … Continue reading

Posted in Carmel Finley, Environmental History, Fisheries economics, Fisheries policy, fisheries science, History of Science, History of Technology, Maritime History, Ocean fishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet fishing, Soviet history' | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The labor problem with king crab

“We’re on our way to hell, mate!”[1] That’s the opening line of a gripping short story about life on a Japanese king crab canning boat in the 1930s. The story was written by Takiji Kobayashi (1903-1933), one of the most … Continue reading

Posted in Carmel Finley, Environmental History, fisheries science, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Japanese fishing, Maritime History, Ocean fishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, Soviet history', World History | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Overlooking king crab

  We must say we have really overlooked the importance of king crab in the development of fisheries in the North Pacific. The development of crab canning vessels, first by the Japanese, and then by Soviets, were significant developments in … Continue reading

Posted in boat building, fisheries science, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Japanese fishing, Maritime History, Ocean fishing, Pacific Explorer, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, Soviet history', World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You teach this stuff?

It’s not easy being a historian who specializes in stuff that most people think is dead boring. But fish and fisheries science have a long and colorful history, and  that history has a lot to say about how many fish … Continue reading

Posted in boat building, Carmel Finley, Cold War, Environmental History, Fisheries policy, fisheries science, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Marine Policy, Maritime History, Ocean fishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, Rosefish, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, Soviet history', World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

More American boats for post-war foreign fisheries

As we have noted, a number of fishing boats were either built or reconditioned shortly after World War II and shipped to various foreign countries.  In 1949, the U.S. Army bought 12 motor trawlers for the Germany fishing industry and … Continue reading

Posted in boat building, Cold War, Environmental History, Fisheries economics, fisheries science, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Japanese fishing, Marine Policy, Maritime History, Overfishing, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, Soviet history', World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

“Made in America—Russia’s Great Floating Cannery”

We are intrigued at the number of post-war fishing boats that were built in the United States for delivery to foreign countries. According to the pages of Pacific Fisherman, one of the lend lease projects was a 360-foot crab canning … Continue reading

Posted in boat building, Carmel Finley, Cold War, Environmental History, Fisheries policy, Fishing, History of Science, History of Technology, Japanese fishing, Maritime History, Pacific Fishing History Project, SCAP, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing, Soviet history' | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The fishing fleet the Americans built for the Soviets

We are feeling quite efficient these days, always pleasant. The book is actually going quite well and we are tossing around the word “deadline” without flinching very much, which perhaps is not wise. But there have been some interesting connections … Continue reading

Posted in boat building, Cold War, Environmental History, Fisheries policy, fisheries science, History of Science, History of Technology, Maritime History, Pacific Fishing History Project, Soviet environmental history, Soviet fishing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment